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Signaling in Telecommunication Networks, Second Edition, by John G. van Bosse and Fabrizio U. Devetak Copyright # 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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5. Public Land Mobile Network: Network Functions, Rec. Q.1002, ITU-T, Geneva, 1989. 6. Mobile Station Land Station Compatibility Speci cation, EIA/TIA-553, Electronic Industries Association, Washington, DC, 1989. 7. Cellular Features Description, TIA/EIA/IS-53, Telecommunications Industry Association, Washington, DC, 1991. 8. D. J. Goodman, Trends in Cellular and Cordless Communications, IEEE Commun. Mag., 29, No. 6, June 1991. 9. J. E. Padgett et al., Overview of Wireless Communications, IEEE Commun. Mag., 33, No. 1, Jan. 1995. 10. M. Rahnema, Overview of the GSM System and Protocol Architecture, IEEE Commun. Mag., 31, No. 4, Apr. 1993. 11. D. D. Falconer, F. Adachi, and B. Gudmundson, Time Division Multiple Access Methods for Wireless Personal Telecommunications, IEEE Commun. Mag., 33, No. 1, Jan. 1995. 12. Cellular System Dual-Mode Mobile Station Base Station Compatibility Standard, EIA/ TIA/IS-54-B, Telecommunications Industry Association, Washington, DC, 1992. 13. Mobile Station Base Station Compatibility Standard for Dual-Mode Wideband Spread Spectrum Cellular System, TIA/EIA/IS-95, Telecommunications Industry Association, Washington, DC, 1993. 14. M. Mouly and M. B. Pautet, The GSM System for Mobile Communications, published by the authors, France, 1992. 15. European Digital Cellular Telecommunication System (Phase 2), MS BSS Interface Data Link Speci cation, GSM 04.06, European Telecommunications Standards Institute, Sophia Antipolis, France, 1994. 16. European Digital Cellular Telecommunication System (Phase 2), BSS MSC Interface Principles, GSM 08.02, European Telecommunications Standards Institute, Sophia Antipolis, France, 1994. 17. European Digital Cellular Telecommunication System (Phase 2), BSS MSC Interface Layer 1 Speci cation, GSM 08.04, European Telecommunications Standards Institute, Sophia Antipolis, France, 1994. 18. European Digital Cellular Telecommunication System (Phase 2), Signaling Transport Mechanisms Between BSS and MSC, GSM 08.06, European Telecommunications Standards Institute, Sophia Antipolis, France, 1994. 19. European Digital Cellular Telecommunication System (Phase 2), MSC to BSS Layer 3 Speci cation, GSM 08.08, European Telecommunications Standards Institute, Sophia Antipolis, France, 1994. 20. Identi cation Plan for Land Mobile Stations, Rec. E.212, ITU-T, Geneva, 1989. 21. European Digital Cellular Telecommunication System (Phase 2), Mobile Radio Interface Layer 3 Speci cation, GSM 04.08, European Telecommunications Standards Institute, Sophia Antipolis, France, 1994. 22. Public Land Mobile Network: Location Registration Procedures, Rec. Q.1003, ITU-T, Geneva, 1989.
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Yes. Your custom Layout Master handles just like any other Layout Master. See Rename a Master earlier in this chapter to review how to rename your custom Layout Master.
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M. W. Ganz, R. L. Moses, and S. L. Wilson, Convergence the SMI Algorithms with of Weak Interference, IEE Trans. Antenna Propagation, vol. 38, pp. 394-399, March 1990.
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The Multiple Radius Fillet option in the Fillet PropertyManager enables you to make multiple fillet sizes within a single fillet feature. Figure 7.34 shows how the multiple radius Fillet feature looks when you are working with it. You can change values in the callout flags or in the PropertyManager.
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transmit packets at arbitrary times, there will be collisions between packets whenever packet transmissions overlap by any amount of time, as indicated in Fig. 11.22. Thus, after sending a packet, the user waits a length of time equal to the round-trip delay for an acknowledgment (ACK) from the receiver. If no acknowledgment is received, the packet is assumed lost in a collision and is retransmitted with a randomly selected delay, to avoid repeated collisions. This is a very simple distributed medium access control method for bursty data packets that does not need passive or active coordination among the terminals and the base station. Let us assume for simplicity that all packets have a standard length and each packet requires the same amount of time Tp for transmission. Now, referring to Fig. 11.22, consider the transmission of packet A beginning at time t0 , and let us determine the interval of time during which packet A is vulnerable to collision. If another user starts the transmission of packet B between times t0 Tp and t0 , the end of packet B will collide with the beginning of packet A. This can occur if long propagation times make it impossible for the sender of packet A to know that the transmission of packet B had already begun. Similarly, if another user begins transmitting packet C between times t0 and t0 + Tp , the beginning of packet C will collide with the end of packet A. From this we can see that the vulnerable interval for packet A is 2Tp , twice the packet transmission time. If two packets overlap by even the smallest amount of time, each packet will suffer one or more errors, which will be recognized at the receiver by the failure of the error-detection parity-check bits on each packet. The receiver will not be able to acknowledge receipt of either packet, and both will have to be retransmitted. Let us now determine the channel throughput S, which we de ne as the average number of successful packet transmissions per time interval Tp . Also, let us assume an in nite population of users, and let G be the traf c intensity or total traf c offered to the channel, de ned as the number of packet transmissions attempted per packet time Tp , including new packets as well as retransmissions of old packets. The standard unit of traf c ow is the erlang, named for the Danish mathematician A. K. Erlang, whose formulas for traf c engineering was discussed in Section 11.4.6. For our purposes here, we can de ne an erlang by thinking of the channel time being segmented into intervals
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We take more care in bringing that clock radio to life than the original manufacturer took to make it. We put it through more tests, more ne tuning than any repair service could afford. We get more out of that $10 heap of parts and labor than even the most quality-conscious manufacturer. And we did our bit for ecology by not wasting good raw materials.
quent. In the worst case (travel, other sites, full schedules), do it by phone (e-mail is not interactive and not sufficient).
WL(i+2)
While the crop functionality described previously works well for what it is, you often will want to resize a photo for specific needs. Perhaps you want to create something that correctly fits the resolution of your screen so it will make a good desktop wallpaper. Or maybe you want a version that is more appropriate for the small screen on your smart phone or other portable device. Whatever the reason, you can easily resize photos in Photo Gallery if you know the trick. The thing is, Resize isn t an option that appears overtly anywhere in the Windows Live Photo Gallery user interface. Instead, you need to right-click on an individual photo thumbnail to find the Resize option. When you select this, you ll see the Resize dialog shown in Figure 12-55.
A well-known class of linear codes are the Hamming codes. A Hamming code can be de ned most easily through its parity check matrix. The columns of H contain all possible 2N K bit combinations of length K, with the exception of the all-zero word. Consequently, all columns of H are distinct. Note that the parity check matrix of Eq. (14.38) ful lls the condition, as can be easily veri ed by the reader. The size of a Hamming code is (2m 1, 2m 1 m), where m is a positive integer.
Proof It suffices to show
Figure 1.21 Flow chart for LNA design procedures.
There are times when, regardless of which features you choose to move and which direction you choose to move them in, you are faced with the task of moving many features. This can be timeconsuming and tedious, not to mention have the potential to introduce errors. To simplify this process, you can put all the features to be moved into a single folder, and then reorder the folder. Keep in mind that the items in the folder need to be a continuous list (you cannot skip features), and you can only reorder the folder if each individual feature within the folder can be reordered.
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